Little House on the Prairie

The true way to live is to enjoy every moment as it passes, and surely it is in the everyday things around us that the beauty of life lies.

-Laura Ingalls Wilder

June’s Happily Ever After block was Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie. I read some of the books as a child but didn’t really remember much of the details so this was a perfect opportunity for a reread.

Frosted Pumpkin Stitchery Happily Ever Stitch a Long Little House on the Prairie

I read the first four books in the series (Little House in the Big Woods, Farmer Boy, Little House on the Prairie, and On the Banks of Plum Creek) and quite enjoyed them for the most part. I loved the descriptions of farming and cooking and making butter and sewing clothes and all the details of self-sufficiency. Reading this as an adult though makes me really wonder about a few things – what kind of father puts his family through all of that when it isn’t necessary? And the attitude towards ‘Indians’ in Little House on the Prairie – I know it was written at a different time but oh my!

Anyway, on to the cross stitch.

There was a lot of brown this month so that’s where I started. I at least half the stitching was done before I moved along to the next colour family…

Frosted Pumpkin Stitchery Happily Ever Stitch a Long Little House on the Prairie

Can you even see any difference in this next picture? This is almost an entire day’s worth of stitching (clouds, wagon cover, and Laura’s apron) and it hardly shows.

Frosted Pumpkin Stitchery Happily Ever Stitch a Long Little House on the Prairie

Adding the greens and greys helped a little bit, but barely. I think the only reason you can sort of see the white sections in the finished block is simply because there’s another colour for contrast next to them.

Frosted Pumpkin Stitchery Happily Ever Stitch a Long Little House on the Prairie

Oh well, at least it’s done. I even had time to get a bit ahead on the frames. My goal is to have all the framing donee by the end of August; I know from experience that cross stitching is much easier with natural lighting so I’d like to have as much done as possible when the days are shorter in the fall.

Frosted Pumpkin Stitchery Happily Ever Stitch a Long

July’s block is The Wind in the Willows and m quite looking forward to it.

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3 thoughts on “Little House on the Prairie

  1. I am getting up the nerve to ask you, what is probably a silly, question. The red thread guidelines on your canvas… do you sew them in before you start or do you buy canvas with red lines sewn in? I have done a few cross stitch pictures, a couple I framed for myself, and have never seen red guide lines or thought to put sew them in on my canvases. It would have made the counting, etc. so much easier!

    • Not a silly question at all!

      I stitched the red gridlines in myself – I used regular sewing machine thread and did 8 over and 2 under so that when they intersect I’m basically left with a 10×10 grid on the fabric (the pattern I’m using is set up on a 10×10 grid). You can actually buy special ‘thread’ just for grinding that’s essentially very fine fishing line – that way you don’t need to worry about piercing your gridlines when you’re stitching.

      It was actually pretty time-consuming but this is a project that’s designed to be spread out over an entire year so I thought it was worth it, but I don’t think I would do it for smaller projects. I’ve seen fabric that you can buy with the gridlines already worked in and supposedly you can wash out the lines when you’re done, but I knew that I would be washing/ironing this particular project many times over the course of the year and I wasn’t sure how those printed lines would hold up.

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